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> Other poppies and narcotic plants, Tibetan poppy, Mexican Prickly Poppy, Corydalis
shaganoz
post May 12 2008, 09:00 AM
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Hello there!

Someone told me I should look into Corydalis as a source for "opiate highs". Anyone know what species of Corydalis? It's more than 300 of them. I looked up THP on Wikipedia, was not much info but said it had barbiturate type of effects and affected the GABA system.
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrahydroprogesterone )

In addition it says this about Corydalis species:
QUOTE
Bulbocapnine is an alkaloid found in Corydalis and Dicentra, herbs in the family Fumariaceae that can cause fatal poisoning in sheep and cattle.
According to the Dorlands Medical Dictionary, it "inhibits the reflex and motor activities of striated muscle. It has been used in the treatment of muscular tremors and vestibular nystagmus"[1]. The psychiatrist Robert Heath carried out experiments on prisoners at the Louisiana State Penitentiary using bulbocapnine to induce stupour[2].

The author William Burroughs references the drug in his book Naked Lunch, where the fictional Dr. Benway uses it to induce obedience in torture victims.

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulbocapnine )

-

Tibetan Poppy:
QUOTE
Meconopsis horridula
Uses: Medicinal
From Tibet, where this purple or wine-flowered poppy can be found at elevations up to 7000m/19000ft. Root, used in Tibetan medicine, has narcotic properties.

( http://www.richters.com/Web_store/web_stor...d=1544704.11618 )

Anyone know more about the narcotic properties of this plant and how its used etc, what alkaloids is in it and so on? Tried look it up but didn't find much about it.

I did find out it contains Beta-carbolines though, and according to wikipedia:
QUOTE
Corydalis contains the alkaloid bulbocapnine, which is occasionally used in medicine.

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalis )

Beta-carbolines:
QUOTE
β-carboline alkaloids are widespread in plants and animals, and frequently act as monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI). As components of the liana Banisteriopsis caapi, the β-carbolines harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine play a pivotal role in the pharmacology of the psychedelic brew ayahuasca. Some β-carbolines, notably tryptoline and pinoline, are formed naturally in the human body. The latter is implicated along with melatonin in the role of the pineal gland in regulating the sleep-wake cycle.

The structure of β-carboline is similar to that of tryptamine, with the ethylamine chain re-connected to the indole ring via an extra carbon atom, to produce a three-ringed structure. Indeed, biosynthesis of β-carbolines is believed to follow this route from analogous tryptamines. Different levels of saturation are possible in the third ring, which is indicated here in the structural formula by colouring the optionally double bonds red and blue

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta-carboline )

That didn't tell me much about its "narcotic effects" though. Anyone got more info on this plant?

Also interested in Argemone Mexicana info (Mexican prickly poppy) such as how it is commonly used, what effects and what alkaloids are responsible.

The little info on wikipedia about it of interest is these parts:
QUOTE
This argemone resin contains berberine and protopine, and is used medicinally as a sedative.

This plant and extract there from is also sold online as an herbal marijuana alternative. Argemone mexicana is also used by traditional healers in Mali to treat malaria.[3]

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argemone_mexicana )

More info about any of the above, as well as other poppies or other unusual narcotic herbs of interest would be interesting hearing about. No need to mention the more common ones like kava and kratom though =)

I was also told "Pedicularis, Wild Lettuce and Blue Lotus may also be worth a look." But I do not know anything about these ones except that I did try blue lotus extract ones without noticing any effects - any comments on possible use of these ones, and how they should be used and what alkaloids are of interest?

Thanks!


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-Everything I write is fictional entertainment and should not be taken seriously-
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Br@nd
post May 12 2008, 03:11 PM
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Hey man,how goes it?I'm also interested in the Prickly Poppy,and recently acquired some seeds from this beautiful plant.I got them about 2 weeks ago,and they are showing no signs of germination.I've never been able to get them to germinate,and it really makes me mad,because I think it would make a lovely addition to my garden.Check out this info I found on them,it says they may be hallucinogenic.
The whole plant is analgesic, antispasmodic, possibly hallucinogenic and sedative. It contains alkaloids similar to those in the opium poppy (P. somniferum) and so can be used as a mild pain-killer.
The fresh yellow, milky, acrid sap contains protein-dissolving substances and has been used in the treatment of warts, cold sores, cutaneous affections, skin diseases, itches etc. It has also been used to treat cataracts and has been taken internally in the treatment of dropsy and jaundice.
The root is alterative and has been used in the treatment of chronic skin diseases.
The flowers are expectorant and have been used in the treatment of coughs and other chest complaints.
The seed is demulcent, emetic, expectorant and laxative. An infusion, in small quantities, is used as a sedative for children, but caution is advised since the oil in the seed is strongly purgative. The seed has also been used as an antidote to snake poisoning.
The oil from the seed is purgative. It has been used in the treatment of skin problems.Caution is advised in the use of this oil, prolonged ingestion produces toxic effects resembling those occurring in epidemic dropsy.
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denm
post May 14 2008, 07:52 PM
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Lettuce extract works for me but for me it is more of a body relaxant and doesn't give a big high at all.

Then again I ate only 1g maybe I will try eat 2g next time I get some.

doesn't have a bad taste at all. It is like a slightly sour lickerish. Smoking seems to work too but I like eating it better.
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Nepenthe
post Jun 18 2008, 09:30 AM
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I don't have experience with beta-Carbolines from poppies, but I have taken them from syrian rue. As I can't speak qualitatively (or quantitatively for that matter) about the nature of the purified chemical vs. the plant, take what I say lightly. I found it to be very bitter and nausea-inducing. As to a high, I later did DMT so the experience was a combination of two drugs as opposed to one. I have heard of people trying to experiment with large doses of beta-Carbolines, and the literature seems to suggest that they are definitely psychoactive by themselves-- again, as most people are ingesting them in plant form, the typical experiment involves LOTS of vomitting.

As to other poppies, I am growing a Meconopsis this year, or at least I'm trying to. It's said to be a challenging plant to grow, but I think I've got a good site for it. The flowers on a Meconopsis are truly incredible. Unfortunately, I don't know what species I have, but oh well.

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denm
post Jun 18 2008, 06:43 PM
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Blue flowers WOW they are stunning !
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Nepenthe
post Jun 19 2008, 11:17 AM
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I saw that picture and was really wowed by it myself. It's such a vibrant and intense shade of blue. Maybe with any luck I'll get some like that, but I'm not very hopeful, right now my Meconopsis is still very small. Oh well, I have fun growing things regardless, and as this is my garden's first real year to get established, everything should do better next year...Perennials it seems need a year just to get their roots started well.
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