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> Mccormick Seeds and Temperature for Germination
whiterabbit
post Mar 15 2009, 05:52 PM
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Hey all

I'm starting my first year of poppy growing experimentation. After buying overpriced seeds over the internet (persian white, persian blue, hens and chicks). I was pleasantly surprised to learn on the forum that Mccormick poppy seeds from the grocery store also work. I'm guessing they're some kind of persian blue variety based on the way the seeds look.

Considering how affordable Mccormick seeds are (600 grams for $4), I decided to completely cover the grounds of my apartment complex, local irrigated areas, and a clay dirt field. I live in Oklahoma and the dirt is very red with copper. I'm hoping I will get some luck with growth this year.

I have a few questions if any experienced growers would so indulge me. First off, I know that the best germination for poppies is 55F. I think I may have planted a little bit late in Oklahoma. An internet site says if temperatures are too warm, to put the seeds in the refrigerator for a week and they will germinate when planted outside even if conditions are warmer. Has anyone had luck with refrigerating seeds prior to germination? Is it important that the seeds are actually in soil when they are in the refrigerator? If not, could you just store the jars of Mccormick seeds in the refrigerator for a few weeks/months and then plant them outside?

One more question: If poppy seeds don't germinate this year for some reason (i.e. too hot temperature), will they still be viable next year and the year after? I have a feeling I might walk back to some of the areas I planted a few years from now and finally see things growing.

Thanks for all of your help. Peace Out -- White Rabbit
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post Mar 15 2009, 07:16 PM
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Foyle
post Mar 15 2009, 11:05 PM
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QUOTE(whiterabbit @ Mar 15 2009, 05:52 PM) *

Hey all

I'm starting my first year of poppy growing experimentation. After buying overpriced seeds over the internet (persian white, persian blue, hens and chicks). I was pleasantly surprised to learn on the forum that Mccormick poppy seeds from the grocery store also work. I'm guessing they're some kind of persian blue variety based on the way the seeds look.

Considering how affordable Mccormick seeds are (600 grams for $4), I decided to completely cover the grounds of my apartment complex, local irrigated areas, and a clay dirt field. I live in Oklahoma and the dirt is very red with copper. I'm hoping I will get some luck with growth this year.

I have a few questions if any experienced growers would so indulge me. First off, I know that the best germination for poppies is 55F. I think I may have planted a little bit late in Oklahoma. An internet site says if temperatures are too warm, to put the seeds in the refrigerator for a week and they will germinate when planted outside even if conditions are warmer. Has anyone had luck with refrigerating seeds prior to germination? Is it important that the seeds are actually in soil when they are in the refrigerator? If not, could you just store the jars of Mccormick seeds in the refrigerator for a few weeks/months and then plant them outside?

One more question: If poppy seeds don't germinate this year for some reason (i.e. too hot temperature), will they still be viable next year and the year after? I have a feeling I might walk back to some of the areas I planted a few years from now and finally see things growing.

Thanks for all of your help. Peace Out -- White Rabbit



Answers:

McCormick poppy seeds do indeed come from poppies, they are viable, and they will grow poppies similar to the poppies they came from.

I have never grown them but I have read that that the McCormick seeds are produced in Holland.

I have read that Tasmania has a significant poppy growing industry which produces both seeds and materials sold to the medical industry - make of that what you will.

I have seen pictures purported to have been shot in Holland and Tasmania - the flowers were the same - make of that what you will, as well.

I have used the refridgerator to snap flanders seeds out of dormancy. Placed in a dish of water in the fridge for a couple days and then either sewn directly into the flower bed or into peat pellets. In both cases, I sewed when the temps were in the low 60's. Sprouting seems to require regular but not over-abundant moisture, cool weather, and lots of sunlight.

I have read that seeds are best stored in a dark and dry place and I have also read that they can remain viable for years. There are stories from the First World War where artillery barrages would chew up the ground and bring to the surface poppy seeds from who knows how many years past and with the saturating of the ground with nitrates from the explosives, battlefields being covered in poppies a few months after a battle.

FWIW, I would not bandit grow at the apartment complex - waste of seeds - they look like weeds or nettles until they produce their seed pods and would be likely hit with lawn mowers or weed-eaters long before they matured.

Good luck!

-Foyle









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Br@nd
post Mar 16 2009, 01:52 AM
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Yo,McCormick poppies have the highest germination rate out of any poppy I've grown thus far,and will germinate in very warm temps.Just keep em misted in the shade until they pop,then put them in the sun
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Divinity
post Mar 17 2009, 07:07 PM
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VERY bad idea to attempt a guerilla grow on the grounds of your apartment complex (unless you own it and don't mind the potential heat from LE) or on any other privately owned property. Also, if you plan to do it on properties which you are unfamiliar with in terms of ownership, be absolutely sure you don't get caught on them. You could get pegged for tresspassing, "polluting" and may even earn yourself LE surveillance by the narc unit if there are enough plants sprouting up.

Be smart, be careful.
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MEKONE
post Mar 18 2009, 08:34 AM
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I have to agree with DIV on this.Growing on or in the area of your complex can bring you more trouble than it's worth (unless your doing it in your private backyard where no one can see).Try a gurilla grow AWAY from where you rest your head.You don't wan't people around saying"What the heck is the guy in apt.1 growing??".Plus what if there are camaras or other type of surveillance around,it's just not worth it.

As for your othr questions McCormicks do produce very nice plants(just use the search engine).Poppies do MUCH better if germinated where they are going to grow so peat pellets work good if your intrested in germinating them inside.
Good Luck,Stay Safe!!

This post has been edited by MEKONE: Mar 18 2009, 08:36 AM


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whiterabbit
post Mar 20 2009, 09:19 PM
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Thanks for the feedback and suggestions. All of you are an invaluable resource.

Yeah, you're probably right about guerilla growing. That was the stupid, excited kid in me. On the flip side, I originally treated the guerilla growing as a test for the best outdoor growing conditions.

I planted seeds in:
Non-irrigated grassy field
Non-irrigated dirt field
Non-irrigated gravel field
Irrigated neighborhood culdesac/median
moderately irrigated landscape patch
Lava rock landscape
etc..

I recorded all of the spots for later reference. It will be interesting to see what happens but I am not about to go on a big, suspicious looking harvest at any point (should my green thumb be that lucky)

I had originally wanted to start growing inside, and bough this overpriced book: Hydroponic Heroin. I don't have the space and I can't see myself investing in any of that equipment. Besides, having 5 plants that take 5 months to come to maturity just isn't worth it to me.

I had seen earlier posts by you guys debating whether it was best to plant in autumn (August) and let the plants winter over, and maybe get some growth but not as potent VS. plant in early spring (February/March) and get a better overall potency. For my particular climate, Oklahoma, do you have any suggestions about which time would be better? Thanks again about the advice and warnings. I've already read about court cases on the internet and will do everything to avoid that type of situation.

Though I'm just an amateur at poppies, my area of expertise is mycology. The great things about mushrooms is that no direct light is required and you can get a finished product in as little as 2 months. It also requires virtually no space. Maybe I will stick with mushrooms...


Una mas....

If some of my seeds that I planted on March 10-13th do in fact sprout and are not cut by weed eater or lawnmowers, what is the predicted time until maturation? Thanks again

-WR
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Foyle
post Mar 20 2009, 11:20 PM
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The zone I garden in predicates that anyone planting in this zone is better off over-wintering and what I did for my flanders this season was plant when the first decent cold front came through which was late October.

I know you can get snow in OK and I have read that young plants are more tough about cold than more mature plants but someone growing in OK I expect would be best off planting in a window of time where the weather likely will not go below freezing for more than a few hours and not stay above 80 F for more than a few hours.

This presents a pretty broad window in OK which is needed, given the multiple months it takes to grow a plant to where it flowers. At a guess, an OK planter would conceivably plant at the first sign of cool weather in the Fall and be prepared to cover his plants if a hard freeze is inbound.

I know it can get quite hot in OK as well, and quite windy - which is another concern - so given that depending on what kind of flower you grow predicates three to five months of weather where it isn't regularly going above 80 F, perhaps one could plant as late as the beginning of February with some quicker growing types of flowers?

As for your guerrilla plantings in various areas, I have read that the supermarket culinary seeds have a longer growth cycle than some other varieties, like 5 months or so, which would put such plantings to be mature in July or August. My guess is the heat would take out the plants before they could flower since I've read that the plant generally does better in cooler weather. Sorry for the uninspiring news but maybe you'll have a cool summer and if all else fails, there's next season.

I'll definitely be interested to hear your report on how they fared in the different areas you planted in.

-Foyle

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whiterabbit
post Mar 21 2009, 02:27 PM
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Good point about the temperatures in Oklahoma. I was in need of a reality check. I was born and raised in the Pacific NW and wish I was there for the above purposes. Perhaps my operation will be extremely small and moved indoors.

If I were to not buy any lighting equipment and simply put a few plants in front of the window (...AC is on all the time in apartment), do you think this would be a decent environment? What is the best size pot for a mature poppy plant?

If I just had 4-5 flowers at the end of the year, what does this translate to in terms of "snacks"? A few gramcrackers? One night of eating gramcrackers with friends and it's all gone? I figure I might as well take this up as a side hobby to mycology even if it doesn't produce much in the way of quantity.

If I am only going to have a few plants, I figure it should be those ones with absolutely giant pods (Giganteum). What do you guys think the best type would be for growing inside, in front of a window, with AC on all the time. The window gets very good sun exposure as I already have many other plants growing in front of it.

One more question: I haven't read the overpriced book yet (Hydroponic Heroin) but when I skimmed it there was mention of getting flowers in 2-3 months instead of 4-5 with extremely long lighting cycles and fertilizers. Have you guys heard mention of this or known anyone who experimented? That might be the only thing that seems attractive to me about hydroponics. Also, if you do go to the trouble do build one of those things there is room for all other kinds of "snacks" as well. Peace out and thanks again.

-WR
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Foyle
post Mar 21 2009, 08:55 PM
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All of your questions have been asked and have answers, more or less, in the forum - but I know it can be tedious scanning post after post so here's some short answers - but I do recommend that if you're bored, definitely read through the forum - keyword search on some item and scan through the results. There's some real good info here.

Window growing - never done it myself but I've read the indoor growers (using lights) preach twelve hours on, twelve hours off during the plants veg stage and then bump it up to 18 on, six off to kick the plant into flowering. They also change the color temperature of the lights they're using to induce the mature plant to flower. The point here is, if you're just relying on window sunlight you will still be subject to the season in the light sense - unless you are moving plants around to add/subtract sunlight as needed. There's some great light info in hydroponics.

Pot size - the larger the better. I've never grown in pots so I'm guessing when I say I think I read no smaller than six inches across and at least that deep - that's something easily researched.

I have read that culinary seed will produce multiple pods if you pinch off the first pod after it has flowered and swelled and if the weather (lights/temp/moisture) is cooperative. There's a lot of good info on this in hydroponics which can still be applied to growing in dirt.

I read of someone trying to grow gigs and they didn't sprout which disappointed him because the seeds were a little pricey. He swears by culinary seed now. Cheap, easy to find, and a reportedly excellent genetic background which by the look of the flower has a lot in common with the corporate grow operations in Tasmania.

Tons of information, very specific, over in hydroponics regarding shorter grows, best strains, tips, ect. I have read many posts reporting the persian strain is good for indoors as it is reportedly a shorter, bushier plant and also has a comparatively quicker cycle. I've also read that the hydro people get these quick grows because the lighting is all very controlled and as compared to nature - amped up - , as are the nutrients.

Another tip, if you check out some of the forums which deal with indoor cannabis grows, there's a ton of technical information which also translates well for growing almost any plant indoors.

Good luck!

-Foyle



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whiterabbit
post Mar 22 2009, 06:29 PM
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Thanks again, Foyle -- I'll keep you guys posted on my progress this year.
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